Cytoskeleton proteins
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Cytoskeleton proteins a purification manual by G. Isenberg

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Published by Springer in Berlin, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Cytoskeletal proteins -- Purification -- Laboratory manuals.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

StatementG. Isenberg.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQP552.C96 I83 1995
The Physical Object
Pagination267 p. :
Number of Pages267
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL789094M
ISBN 103540590544
LC Control Number95021495

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Of the three types of protein fibers in the cytoskeleton, microfilaments are the narrowest. They function in cellular movement, have a diameter of about 7 nm, and are comprised of two globular protein intertwined strands, which we call actin (Figure ). The standard protocols for the purification of all known cytoskeleton proteins are presented in this manual. Proteins are listed alphabetically and each protocol follows a common format. Thus, the manual provides a quick and easy reference to all relevant procedures for cytoskeleton protein purification. The standard protocols for the purification of all known cytoskeleton proteins are presented in this manual. Proteins are listed alphabetically and each protocol follows a common format. Thus, the manual provides a quick and easy reference to all relevant procedures for cytoskeleton protein. The cytoskeleton is the intracellular filament system that controls the morphology of a cell, allows it to move, and provides trafficking routes for intracellular transport. It comprises three major filament systems-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments-along with a host of adaptors, regulators, molecular motors, and additional.

  Of the three types of protein fibers in the cytoskeleton, microfilaments are the narrowest. They function in cellular movement, have a diameter of about 7 nm, and are made of two intertwined strands of a globular protein called actin (Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)). For this reason, microfilaments are also known as actin filaments.   The book is well organized into three primary parts: Physical Principles, Cytoskeleton, and Motor Proteins. If an engineer is interested in nothing more than gaining insight into the relevant physics at the molecular level, then the book is worth purchasing simply for the well-written section devoted to Part I: Physical Principles. This book is for biology, physics, and engineering students who want to learn about the principles of protein mechanics and how it applies to the morphology and motility of cells. Understanding how motors and the cytoskeleton operate requires mechanical concepts such . The cytoskeleton is a complex, dynamic network of interlinking protein filaments present in the cytoplasm of all cells, including bacteria and archaea. It extends from the cell nucleus to the cell membrane and is composed of similar proteins in the various organisms. In eukaryotes, it is composed of three main components, microfilaments, intermediate filaments and microtubules, and these are.

  Mechanics of Motor Proteins and the Cytoskeleton brings these new findings together. This book is for biology, physics, and engineering students who want to learn about the principles of protein mechanics and how it applies to the morphology and motility of cells. Understanding how motors and the cytoskeleton operate requires mechanical Cited by: GPI-anchored surface proteins mediate many important functions, including transport, signal transduction, adhesion, and protection against complement. They cluster into glycolipid-based membrane domains and caveolae, plasmalemmal vesicles involved in the transcytosis and endocytosis of these surface proteins. The cytoskeleton is responsible for mediating these changes. By providing "tracks" with its protein filaments, the cytoskeleton allows organelles to move around within the cell. In addition to facilitating intracellular organelle movement, by moving itself the cytoskeleton can move the entire cells in multi-cellular organisms. Intermediate filaments have a diameter of about 10 nm, which is intermediate between the diameters of the two other principal elements of the cytoskeleton, actin filaments (about 7 nm) and microtubules (about 25 nm). In contrast to actin filaments and microtubules, the intermediate filaments are not directly involved in cell movements. Instead, they appear to play basically a structural role.